ECE Department Calendar

Apr
4
Fri
Graduate Seminar – “Single Pixel Compressive Imaging with Metamaterials” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Apr 4 @ 9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Single Pixel Compressive Imaging with Metamaterials" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Dr. Willie Padilla, Professor

Dept. of Physics, Boston College

When: Friday, April 4, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

Metamaterials are artificial electromagnetic materials which have realized exotic electromagnetic responses including negative index of refraction and invisibility cloaking. As the underlying physics of these fascinating materials continues to be uncovered, effort is now shifting toward demonstration of devices. I will present the design, fabrication, and demonstration of active metamaterials that function as a real-time tunable, spectrally sensitive spatial masks for use in THz imaging with only a single pixel detector.

Speaker Biography

Willie Padilla received a PhD from the UC San Diego and was a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 2006 he joined the Department of Physics at Boston College and is a Full Professor. In 2007 he was awarded a Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research and Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2011. In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow in 2013.

Apr
7
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “Spatially Distributed Structural Health Monitoring using Electrical Impedance Tomography” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Apr 7 @ 9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Spatially Distributed Structural Health Monitoring using Electrical Impedance Tomography" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Bryan R. Loyola, Steven Paradise, Christopher Hall

Sandia National Laboratories

When: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

The United States is facing a two-pronged infrastructure problem. Many new structures are being built with state-of-the-art materials that do not perform like traditional engineered materials, while the remainder of America’s civil infrastructure is deteriorating at an alarming rate. A recent American Society of Civil Engineers’ report has rated the civil infrastructure of the United States at an overall D+ rating. In addition, fiber-reinforced composite materials are being introduced into many structures, particularly in aircraft, at a higher rate. Unlike traditional monolithic metals, composites manifest their damage internal to their structure, making the damage barely detectable to visual inspection. Researchers across the world have focused their attention towards creating new sensors, sensing methodologies, and sensor platforms to be able to instrument these structures to detect the onset of damage due to environmental conditions and events. In this talk, a sensing skin approach will be discussed aimed at detecting damage in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials, like those used in aircraft or wind turbines. A carbon nanotube-based latex paint has been developed and demonstrated to be sensitive to applied mechanical strain, changes in temperature, and cracking via changes in the film’s electrical conductivity. These sensitivities are utilized by an approach called electrical impedance tomography (EIT), which measures the spatially distributed conductivity across the CNT-based paint. Changes in localized electrical conductivity are indicative of strain, changes in temperature, or impact damage in the specified location. This approach allows for the detection, localization, size evaluation, and severity of damage within the sensing region. This talk will explain how EIT has been applied to detecting damage with applied and embedded CNT films in glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites, as well as using the inherent electrical conductivity of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

Speaker Biographies

Dr. Bryan Loyola is a Senior Member of Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. He earned a B.S. in Physics from the University of California, Davis in 2005, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering from the University of California, Davis in 2010 and 2012, respectively. Dr. Loyola specializes in creating sensing methodologies for structural health monitoring applications, specifically using carbon nanotube thin films and electrical impedance tomography (EIT).

Steven Paradise is a Senior Member of Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Steven graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Utah in 2005 with a BS in Electrical Engineering, and earned his MS in Electrical Engineering the following year, studying nonlinear optical effects under Dr. Steve Blair. In 2006, he began working at Sandia and entered the selective Weapon Intern Program. Since then, he has developed and tested optical technology for use in national security applications, such as improving safety, security, and reliability of weapon systems.

Christopher J. Hall is a Member of Technical Staff in Electrical Engineering at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Chris graduated Magna Cum Laude from Utah State University in 2010 with a BS in Electrical Engineering and minors in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Mandarin Chinese. He began working at Sandia that same year and was a recipient of the Critical Skills Master Program Fellowship. He received his MS in Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011. His work at Sandia includes the design and operation of a fully automated tester and design of electronic devices for use in national security applications.

Apr
8
Tue
Technical Open House @ University Guest House & Conference Center
Apr 8 @ 12:05 pm – Apr 9 @ 5:45 am

The ECE Technical Open House will be held on Thursday, April 8, 2014.

During the day, all graduating seniors will make presentations of their senior thesis projects. Approximately half of the students participating in the conference have completed their projects as part of an Engineering Clinic team. In the Engineering Clinic Program, corporations sponsor projects that are carried out by teams of undergraduate seniors.

Student presentations run throughout the afternoon from 12:05 to 6:05 p.m. in the University Guest House. Click here for a list of student presentations.

Apr
13
Sun
Fall 2014 Registration by appointment begins
Apr 13 – Apr 15 all-day
Spring 2014 Registration by appointment begins
Summer 2014 Open enrollment
Apr 13 – Apr 15 all-day
Summer 2014 Open enrollment
Apr
17
Thu
Last day to reverse CR/NC option
Apr 17 – Apr 19 all-day
Last day to reverse CR/NC option
Second Session Classes: Last day to reverse CR/NC option
Apr 17 – Apr 19 all-day
Second Session Classes: Last day to reverse CR/NC option
Apr
22
Tue
Classes end
Apr 22 – Apr 24 all-day
Classes end
Second Session Classes: Classes end
Apr 22 – Apr 24 all-day
Second Session Classes: Classes end
Apr
24
Thu
Defense: Ram Rakhyani
Apr 24 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

DISSERTATION DEFENSE FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

by

Anil Kumar Ram Rakhyani
Advisor: Gianluca Lazzi

Design and Optimization of Efficient Magnetic Coils for Biomedical Applications

Magnetic fields are permeable to the biological tissues and can induce electric field in the conductive structures. Prosthetic devices such as retinal implants use time-varying magnetic field to achieve wireless power transfer to the implanted magnetic coil. However, devices such as magnetic stimulators use the induction principle to create an electric field at the stimulation site. Efficiency of these devices is primarily dependent on the design of the magnetic coils. Therefore, in this work, we designed and validated efficient magnetic coils for wireless power transfer to implanted devices and magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerves.

In this work, we proposed a multi-coil power transfer system which solves some of the current challenges. The proposed multi-coil WPT system achieves more than twice the power transfer efficiency, controllable voltage gain, wider frequency bandwidth, higher tolerance to coupling and load variations, lower absorbed power in the tissue and lower radiated field from the magnetic coil than a comparable conventional system.

Magnetic coils play an important role in controlling the distribution of induced electric field inside the nerve during magnetic stimulation. In this work, we developed anatomically correct tissue models to study the effect of tissue heterogeneity and the surrounding media on the induced electric field. We also developed an optimization algorithm for designing energy efficient cm-size magnetic coils, that were then used for ex-vivo magnetic stimulation of the frog’s sciatic nerve.


Thursday, April 24, 2014
10:00 a.m.
ECE Conference Room
3235 MEB

The public is invited