ECE Department Calendar

Mar
7
Fri
Graduate Seminar – “Toward Internet-like Energy Systems” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Mar 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Toward Internet-like Energy Systems" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Dr. Masoud Honarvar Nazari, Post Doctoral Fellow

Georgia Institute of Technology

When: Friday, March 7, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

In this talk, I will first discuss needs for transforming today’s fossil-fuel dependent and highly polluting electric power systems into sustainable, efficient, and reliable electric energy systems, which have functionalities similar to Internet.

Next, I will present my recent efforts to design a distributed decision-making and control architecture for internet-like energy systems. I will discuss the fundamental differences between internet-like distribution energy systems and conventional transmission power systems, regarding dynamic behavior under a high penetration of distributed generators.

Then, I will present a novel distributed frequency regulation architecture, whereby frequency regulators communicate with their neighbors in the network in order to improve performance. I will show that despite the frequency regulators being distributed, stability can be ensured while avoiding inter-area oscillations using a limited control effort. The efficacy of the proposed frequency regulation framework is shown through simulations on two real-world electric energy systems of different scale and complexity.

Speaker Biography

Masoud Honarvar Nazari is a Post Doctoral Fellow in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his first Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering in a joint program between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Porto, Portugal in 2012 and obtained his second Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon in the same year. He was a visiting scholar at MIT Energy Initiative in 2010. He was also awarded the five-year international FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia) fellowship in 2007. His research interests include Power System and Smart Grid operation; Distributed Control Architecture for Internet-like Energy Systems; Large-scale Integration of Distributed Energy Sources, and; Policy implication and regulation design for modernizing Electric Power Systems. He has several book chapters, journals, and conference papers in the subject of Power System Stability and Control.

Mar
17
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “The Telecommunication Network” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Mar 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "The Telecommunication Network" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Mr. Tom Armstrong, Chief Technologist for Broadband Communication Systems

Applied Signal Technology – Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems

When: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

The Global Telecommunication Network touches our lives daily, and many do not appreciate the complexity of the network. This talk introduces fundamental engineering concepts of the network in a simplified view, and shows that the evolution of the core network in meeting today’s communication needs has not changed since the late 1800s.

Speaker Biography

Tom Armstrong is the chief technologist for Broadband Communication Systems in the Applied Signal Technology mission area of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. In this role, he provides direction and vision in all technical aspects of signal communications and intelligence product and system development and deployment: aspects including product design, system integration and test, operations and maintenance, and mission management and analysis. He is also a Raytheon Applied Signal Technology Senior Fellow and in such capacity he directs research and development in advanced modulation, high speed switching, error correction, signal multiplexing, communication protocols, and signal processing technologies.

Prior to joining Raytheon Applied Signal Technology in 1999, Armstrong enjoyed a twelve-year career at the U.S. Department of Defense. He served in many technical capacities. In his final position with the DoD, he served as Technical Director of one of the operational divisions where he oversaw all aspects of design, development, and deployment of multiple signal communications systems.

Mr. Armstrong earned his bachelor and master degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Utah in 1986 and 1987, respectively. On two different occasions—in 1997 and again in 2004—he received a Meritorious Citation from the US Government for exceptional achievement and superior performance which contributed significantly to the deployment of a major technical system of national importance.

Apr
4
Fri
Graduate Seminar – “Single Pixel Compressive Imaging with Metamaterials” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Apr 4 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Single Pixel Compressive Imaging with Metamaterials" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Dr. Willie Padilla, Professor

Dept. of Physics, Boston College

When: Friday, April 4, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

Metamaterials are artificial electromagnetic materials which have realized exotic electromagnetic responses including negative index of refraction and invisibility cloaking. As the underlying physics of these fascinating materials continues to be uncovered, effort is now shifting toward demonstration of devices. I will present the design, fabrication, and demonstration of active metamaterials that function as a real-time tunable, spectrally sensitive spatial masks for use in THz imaging with only a single pixel detector.

Speaker Biography

Willie Padilla received a PhD from the UC San Diego and was a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 2006 he joined the Department of Physics at Boston College and is a Full Professor. In 2007 he was awarded a Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research and Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2011. In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow in 2013.

Apr
7
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “Spatially Distributed Structural Health Monitoring using Electrical Impedance Tomography” @ Warnock (WEB) 1230
Apr 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Spatially Distributed Structural Health Monitoring using Electrical Impedance Tomography" @ Warnock (WEB) 1230

Bryan R. Loyola, Steven Paradise, Christopher Hall

Sandia National Laboratories

When: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1230

Abstract

The United States is facing a two-pronged infrastructure problem. Many new structures are being built with state-of-the-art materials that do not perform like traditional engineered materials, while the remainder of America’s civil infrastructure is deteriorating at an alarming rate. A recent American Society of Civil Engineers’ report has rated the civil infrastructure of the United States at an overall D+ rating. In addition, fiber-reinforced composite materials are being introduced into many structures, particularly in aircraft, at a higher rate. Unlike traditional monolithic metals, composites manifest their damage internal to their structure, making the damage barely detectable to visual inspection. Researchers across the world have focused their attention towards creating new sensors, sensing methodologies, and sensor platforms to be able to instrument these structures to detect the onset of damage due to environmental conditions and events. In this talk, a sensing skin approach will be discussed aimed at detecting damage in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials, like those used in aircraft or wind turbines. A carbon nanotube-based latex paint has been developed and demonstrated to be sensitive to applied mechanical strain, changes in temperature, and cracking via changes in the film’s electrical conductivity. These sensitivities are utilized by an approach called electrical impedance tomography (EIT), which measures the spatially distributed conductivity across the CNT-based paint. Changes in localized electrical conductivity are indicative of strain, changes in temperature, or impact damage in the specified location. This approach allows for the detection, localization, size evaluation, and severity of damage within the sensing region. This talk will explain how EIT has been applied to detecting damage with applied and embedded CNT films in glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites, as well as using the inherent electrical conductivity of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

Speaker Biographies

Dr. Bryan Loyola is a Senior Member of Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. He earned a B.S. in Physics from the University of California, Davis in 2005, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering from the University of California, Davis in 2010 and 2012, respectively. Dr. Loyola specializes in creating sensing methodologies for structural health monitoring applications, specifically using carbon nanotube thin films and electrical impedance tomography (EIT).

Steven Paradise is a Senior Member of Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Steven graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Utah in 2005 with a BS in Electrical Engineering, and earned his MS in Electrical Engineering the following year, studying nonlinear optical effects under Dr. Steve Blair. In 2006, he began working at Sandia and entered the selective Weapon Intern Program. Since then, he has developed and tested optical technology for use in national security applications, such as improving safety, security, and reliability of weapon systems.

Christopher J. Hall is a Member of Technical Staff in Electrical Engineering at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Chris graduated Magna Cum Laude from Utah State University in 2010 with a BS in Electrical Engineering and minors in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Mandarin Chinese. He began working at Sandia that same year and was a recipient of the Critical Skills Master Program Fellowship. He received his MS in Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011. His work at Sandia includes the design and operation of a fully automated tester and design of electronic devices for use in national security applications.

Jun
4
Wed
ECE Seminar – Control and Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems: Some Recent Trends @ Warnock (WEB) 1250
Jun 4 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
ECE Seminar - Control and Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems:  Some Recent Trends @ Warnock (WEB) 1250

Stephane Lafortune

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

When: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 at 3:00 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

We will present an overview of recent research trends in control and diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems (DES) that are motivated by challenges arising in cyber-physical systems.

In the first part of the talk, we will review the basic theory of supervisory control of DES, discuss its connection with reactive synthesis in computer science, and present results on its application to the problem of collision avoidance in vehicular networks. In this application, the continuous dynamics of the vehicles are abstracted in a discrete-event model, where uncontrollable events capture unmodeled dynamics and unobservable events capture measurement uncertainty.

In the second part of the talk, we will review the basic theory of fault diagnosis in partially-observed DES and then discuss recent work on enforcement of opacity, a class of properties studied in computer security. Opacity is essentially the dual of diagnosability. We will discuss how opacity enforcement techniques can be used to protect users’ privacy in location-based services.

Speaker Biographies

Stéphane Lafortune is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He obtained his degrees from Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal (B.Eng), McGill University (M.Eng), and the University of California at Berkeley (PhD), all in electrical engineering. Dr. Lafortune is a Fellow of the IEEE (1999). His research interests are in discrete event systems and include multiple problem domains: modeling, diagnosis, control, optimization, and applications to computer systems. He co-authored, with C. Cassandras, the textbook Introduction to Discrete Event Systems (2nd Edition, Springer, 2008). He is co-developer of the software packages DESUMA and UMDES.

Sep
15
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “Using Sparsity-Based Models to Characterize and Monitor Critical Infrastructures” @ Warnock (WEB 1250)
Sep 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Using Sparsity-Based Models to Characterize and Monitor Critical Infrastructures" @ Warnock (WEB 1250)

Dr. Joel Harley

University of Utah Electrical & Computer Engineering Department

When: Monday, September 15, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

In engineering and the sciences, there is considerable interest in new technology to sense and monitor large, physical environments. These systems have applications in many fields, including civil and aerospace engineering, medicine, oceanography, and seismology. For civil and aerospace applications, these technologies can be used to noninvasively monitor the structural integrity of bridges, pipes, airplanes, and other modern structures to reduce maintenance costs and prevent catastrophic failures in transportation, power, and resource distribution networks.

Ultrasonic guided waves (waves that are “guided” by the geometry of the environment) have been of particular interest for monitoring critical infra-structures due to their sensitivity to damage and capability to interrogate large areas at once. To detect, locate, and evaluate damage, ultrasonic guided waves are measured and analyzed using various signal processing strategies. However, successfully detecting and locating damage is challenging because complex propagation environments significantly distort the waves as they travel through the medium.

This talk presents a signal processing framework for overcoming these challenges by combining the physical principles of ultrasonic waves with novel data-driven signal processing strategies. Through experimental data, I demonstrate how to characterize complex environments and use their properties to improve to improve detection, localization, and characterization performance. We briefly discuss how these strategies can be extended to other applications.

Speaker Biography

Joel B. Harley received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Tufts University, Medford, MA, in 2008 and a M.S. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA in 2011, and a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA in 2014. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. His interests include the integration of complex wave propagation models with novel signal processing, machine learning, and big data methods for applications in structural health monitoring, nondestructive evaluation, medical imaging, electrical monitoring, and other fields.

Dr. Harley is a recipient of the 2009 National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, the 2009 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship, the 2009 Department of Homeland Security Graduate Fellowship (declined), and the 2008 Lamme/Westinghouse Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Fellowship. He is also the recipient of the 2014 Carnegie Mellon A.G. Jordan Award for academic excellence and exceptional service. He has published more than 30 technical journal and conference papers, including four best student papers. He is a student representative for the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society, a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, and a member of the Acoustical Society of America.

Sep
22
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “High-Efficiency PA Techniques: Incorporating Novel Devices and Architectures for Improved Efficiency Wideband and High-Speed Communication” @ Warnock (WEB 1250)
Sep 22 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar - "High-Efficiency PA Techniques: Incorporating Novel Devices     and Architectures for      Improved Efficiency Wideband and High-Speed Communication" @ Warnock (WEB 1250)

Dr. Jeffrey S. Walling

University of Utah Electrical & Computer Engineering Department

When: Monday, September 22, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

CMOS is used nearly ubiquitously for digital computation, and as such plays an ever increasing role in our lives as we increasingly use computation to improve working efficiency. Increasing levels of integration have made it possible to embed analog and RF circuits with digital processing on a single integrated circuit. The RF power amplifier (PA) has been the exception to integration in CMOS, owing to its relatively poor performance (e.g., peak output power and energy efficiency) when compared to other semiconductor technologies (e.g., III-V compounds and SiGe). In this talk I will introduce digital PAs (DPAs), which leverage CMOS inherent strengths of fast switching speeds and superior lithographic matching to yield a linear, efficient digital power amplifier. I will also examine current research in the University of Utah Power Efficient RFIC lab addressing limitations in DPAs, and high power PAs using GaN devices. The aim of such PAs is to enable reconfigurable operation for software-defined and cognitive radios networks.

Speaker Biography

Jeff Walling received the B.S. degree from the University of South Florida, Tampa, in 2000, and the M.S. and Ph. D. degrees from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. Prior to starting his graduate education he was employed at Motorola, Plantation, FL working in cellular handset development. He interned for Intel, Hillsboro from 2006-2007, where he worked on highly-digital transmitter architectures and CMOS power amplifiers and continued this research while a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the University of Washington. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the ECE Department at University of Utah, where he directs the Power Efficient RFIC Lab.

His current research interests include power amplifier design, high-efficiency transmitter architectures and low energy wireless circuits. Dr. Walling has authored over 30 articles in peer reviewed journals and refereed conferences and holds two patents. Recently he received the Best Paper Award at Mobicom 2012. He has also received the Yang Award for outstanding graduate research from the University of Washington, Department of Electrical Engineering in 2008, an Intel Predoctoral Fellowship in 2007-2008, and the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2006.

Sep
29
Mon
Graduate Seminar @ Warnock (WEB 1250)
Sep 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Graduate Seminar @ Warnock (WEB 1250)

Dr. Richard Brown

Dean, University of Utah College of Engineering
Professor, University of Utah Electrical & Computer Engineering Department

When: Monday, September 29, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

To be posted soon.

Oct
6
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “Big Data Visual Analysis” @ Warnock (WEB 1250)
Oct 6 @ 3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Big Data Visual Analysis" @ Warnock (WEB 1250)

Dr. Chris Johnson

Director, SCI Institute
Distinguished Professor, University of Utah School of Computing

When: Monday, October 6, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

We live in an era in which the creation of new data is growing exponentially such that every two days we create as much new data as we did from the beginning of mankind until the year 2003. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most important tools to understand such large and often complex data. In this talk, I will present state-of-the-art visualization techniques, including ways to visually characterize associated error and uncertainty, applied to Big Data problems in science, engineering, and medicine.

Speaker Biography

Chris Johnson is the founding director the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah where he is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and holds faculty appointments in the Departments of Physics and Bioengineering. His research interests are in the areas of scientific computing and scientific visualization. Dr. Johnson founded the SCI research group in 1992, which has since grown to become the SCI Institute employing over 200 faculty, staff and students. Professor Johnson serves on several international journal editorial boards, as well as on advisory boards to several national research centers. Professor Johnson has received several awards, including the NSF Presidential Faculty Fellow (PFF) award from President Clinton in 1995 and the Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology from Governor Michael Leavitt in 1999. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and in 2009 he was elected a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and received the Utah Cyber Pioneer Award. In 2010 Professor Johnson received the Rosenblatt Award from the University of Utah and the IEEE Visualization Career Award. In 2012, Professor Johnson received the IEEE IPDPS Charles Babbage Award and in 2013 Professor Johnson received the IEEE Sidney Fernbach Award. In 2014, Professor Johnson was elected an IEEE Fellow.

Oct
20
Mon
ECE Judd Distinguished Lecture – “Navigating New Directions in Engineering” @ Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building (SMBB) 2650 - Auditorium
Oct 20 @ 3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
ECE Judd Distinguished Lecture - "Navigating New Directions in Engineering" @ Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building (SMBB) 2650 - Auditorium | Salt Lake City | Utah | United States

Univ. of Utah ECE Dept.
Frontiers in Engineering Innovation
Judd Distinguished Lecture

 

Dr. T.E. Schlesinger

Benjamin T. Rome Dean
Whiting School of Engineering
Johns Hopkins University

When: Monday, October 20, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building (SMBB) 2650 – Auditorium

Refreshments Will Be Served at 2:45 p.m. in the SMBB Atrium

Abstract

The latter half of the twentieth century has been the age of the transistor. To a great extent the fabric of technology that has transformed science, engineering and society through computation, communication, information storage, sensing and networking is based on the transistor and the integration of this device in the billions. As one looks to the future it seems unlikely that the next revolution in technology will emerge in this space. Rather it appears more likely that it is the use of engineering technologies to advance understanding in biology, medicine, and healthcare and to transform these with the discipline of engineering that will produce the type of “game changing” advances that will once again create transformative changes in societies. The organizations that understand how to thrive in this new reality in terms of education, research and the translation of these to impact society will lead this change. In this presentation I will offer a view of why the focus of technology will shift in the coming years and how even at the level of undergraduate curricula institutions must respond to these and other changes so as to position themselves for this new reality.

Speaker Biography

T.E. Schlesinger is the Benjamin T. Rome Dean of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to this he was at Carnegie Mellon University as the David Edward Schramm Professor and Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of the Data Storage Systems Center, Associate Department Head in ECE, founding co-director of the General Motors Collaborative Research Laboratory and Director of the DARPA MISCIC Center. He received his B.Sc. degree in Physics from the University of Toronto in 1980 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1982 and 1985 respectively. His research interests are in the areas of solid state electronic and optical devices, nanotechnology, and information storage systems. He has published over 250 refereed and conference proceedings and holds thirteen patents. He has received a number of recognitions including; the Carnegie Institute of Technology George Tallman Ladd Award for research, and the Benjamin Richard Teare Award for teaching, Presidential Young Investigator Award, 1999 and 1998 R&D 100 Awards for his work on nuclear detectors and electro-optic device technology, the Carnegie Science Center 1998 “Scientist” award, and the ECE Department Heads Association’s Robert M. Janowiak Outstanding Leadership and Service Award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the SPIE, was President of the ECE Department Heads’ Association was a member of the International Advisory Panel for the A*STAR Graduate Academy in Singapore and the Advisory Board for the ECE Department, Georgia Tech and the Technology Commercialization Advisory Board for Innovation Works. He currently serves on Governor of Maryland’s P20 Council and on the National Research Foundation (Singapore) Fellowship Evaluation Panel.