ECE Events Shared to College

Nov
3
Mon
Graduate Seminar
Nov 3 @ 3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
Graduate Seminar @ Warnock Engineering Building (WEB) 1250

Dr. Richard Normann

University of Utah
Distinguished Emertius Professor of Bioengineering and Ophthalmology

When: Monday, November 3, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

Dr. Normann will review recent technologies that are allowing us to directly talk to and listen to individual or small populations of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. These devices provide unprecedented ability to directly control external devices (i.e., computers, wheel chairs, prosthetic limbs) by volitional intent (thought). He will also describe a number of applications of this technology to restore function in individual that have lost function due to disease or trauma.

Speaker Biography

Richard A. Normann, Ph.D. is a Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Bioengineering and Ophthalmology at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City where he conducts research on sensory encoding and information processing by neural ensembles in the vertebrate central and peripheral nervous systems. He is the inventor of the Utah Electrode Array technologies and other high-electrode-count micro-electrode arrays that can be used for basic and applied research in the emerging field of neuroprosthetics. His current research interests are the cortically based restoration of vision in those with profound blindness, and peripheral nerve interventions for the restoration of stance and for the control of prosthetic limbs and bladder control in those who have lost these functions.

Nov
10
Mon
Graduate Seminar – “Digitally-Assisted, Charge-Steering Analog-to-Digital Converters”
Nov 10 @ 3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
Graduate Seminar - "Digitally-Assisted, Charge-Steering Analog-to-Digital Converters" @ Warnock Engineering Building (WEB) 1250

Dr. Shiuh-hua Wood Chiang

Brigham Young University Electrical & Computer Engineering Department

When: Monday, November 10, 2014 at 3:05 p.m.
Where: Warnock 1250

Abstract

Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are widely used in communication systems to interface analog and digital circuits. While the speed, power, and area of digital circuits directly benefit from the decreasing channel length of CMOS devices, analog circuits suffer from reduced headroom, lower intrinsic gain, and higher device mismatch. Consequently, it has been increasingly difficult to design high-speed and low-power pipelined ADCs using conventional op amps. This work presents a pipelined ADC that employs novel “charge-steering” op amps to relax the trade-offs among speed, noise, and power consumption. Such op amps afford a fourfold increase in speed and a twofold reduction in noise for a given power consumption and voltage gain. Using a new clock gating technique, the ADC digitally calibrates the nonlinearity and gain error at full speed. A prototype realized in 65-nm CMOS technology achieves a resolution of 10 bits with a sampling rate of 800 MHz, a power consumption of 19 mW, an SNDR of 52.2 dB at Nyquist, and an FoM of 53 fJ/conversion-step. A new background calibration technique is also proposed to accommodate temperature and supply variations. Current research efforts include extending the digital calibration techniques to ultra low-power neural amplifiers.

Speaker Biography

Shiuh-hua Wood Chiang received his B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada in 2007, the M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine in 2009, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. He was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Communication Circuits Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. From 2013 to 2014 he was a Senior Design Engineer in the RFIC design group in Qualcomm, developing low-power circuits for Bluetooth transceivers. He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Brigham Young University in 2014 as an Assistant Professor. Prof. Chiang received the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2011 and 2012.