Defense: Schlitt


May 1, 2014

When:
May 6, 2014 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2014-05-06T15:00:00-06:00
2014-05-06T17:00:00-06:00
Contact:
Lori Sather
1-6943

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

THESIS DEFENSE FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF SCIENCE

by

Lawrence Schlitt
Advisor: Priyank Kalla

THERMAL CHARACTERIZATION ABSTRACTION FOR INTEGRATED OPTOELECTRONICS

Advances in Silicon Photonics are enabling hybrid integration of optoelectronic circuits alongside current CMOS technologies. To fully exploit the capability of this integration, it is important to explore the effects of thermal gradients on optoelectronic devices. The sensitivity of optical components to temperature variation gives rise to design issues in SOI optoelectronic technology. The thermo-electric effect becomes problematic with the integration of hybrid optoelectronic systems, where heat is generated from electrical components. Through the thermo-optic effect the optical signals are in turn effected and compensation is necessary. To improve the capability of optical SOI designs, optical-wave-simulation models and the characteristic thermal operating environment need to be integrated to ensure proper operation.

In order to exploit the potential for compensation by virtue of resynthesis, temperature characterization on a system level is required. Thermal characterization within the flow of physical design automation tools for hybrid optoelectronic technology enables device resynthesis and validation at a system level. Additionally, thermally-aware routing and placement would be possible. A simplified abstraction will help in the active design process, with the contemporary CAD flow when designing optoelectronic features.

This thesis investigates an abstraction model to characterize the effect of a temperature gradient on optoelectronic circuit operation. To make the approach scalable, reduced order computations are desired the effectively model the effect of temperature on an optoelectronic layout, this is achieved using an electrical analogy to heat flow. Given an optoelectronic circuit and using a thermal resistance network to abstract thermal flow, we compute the temperature distribution throughout the layout. Subsequently, we show how this thermal distribution across the optoelectronic system layout can be integrated with optoelectronic device and system level analysis tools. Validation of the model is performed by comparing the abstract computation to that of full-scale simulations.


Tuesday, May 6, 2014
3:00 p.m.
ECE Conference Room
3235 MEB

The public is invited