Legendary ECE Grad, Simon Ramo, Passes

Legendary ECE Grad, Simon Ramo, Passes

June 30th, 2016

Not long after leaving Howard Hughes’ fledgling Hughes Aircraft Co. and starting an aerospace firm in Los Angeles in 1953, Simon Ramo received a call from President Dwight D. Eisenhower.Dr. Ramo, the chief architect of America’s intercontinental ballistic missile system and an aerospace pioneer who helped shape Southern California into the nation’s center for high-tech weapons research, died June 27 at his home in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 103.His son, Jim Ramo, confirmed the death but did not provide a cause.Dr. Ramo was a California Institute of Technology whiz kid who co-founded aerospace giant TRW Inc., and in his late 80s, brokered one of the biggest mergers ever in the defense industry.(Dr. Ramo graduated from the University of Utah in 1933 with a bachelor’s in electrical engineering. A scholarship fund was established in 1998 by Dr. Ramo as the Simon Ramo Sch[...]

Cynthia Furse Receives Pioneers of Progress Award

Cynthia Furse Receives Pioneers of Progress Award

June 28th, 2016

Cynthia Furse, associate vice president for research at the University of Utah and professor of electrical and computer engineering, is this year’s recipient of the Days of ’47 Pioneers of Progress Award for Science and Technology, the latest in a string of U professors to receive the honor. She is one of five Utahns to receive the Pioneers of Progress Award in 2016, each honored in a number of categories including Sportsmanship and Athletics; Creative and Historic Arts; Business and Enterprise; and Health, Education and Humanitarian Assistance. A sixth award, the President’s Award, was given this year to the 1966 Marine platoon 1071 for its military service during the Vietnam War. Furse was honored in part for her pioneering work in developing a system to locate intermittent electrical wiring faults, which led to her startup company, LiveWire Innovation. Her technology can monitor live [...]

Lighting the Way to Better Semiconductors

Lighting the Way to Better Semiconductors

June 16th, 2016

University of Utah materials science and engineering associate professor Mike Scarpulla wants to shed light on semiconductors — literally. Scarpulla and senior scientist Kirstin Alberi of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, have developed a theory that adding light during the manufacturing of semiconductors — the materials that make up the essential parts of computer chips, solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs) — can reduce defects and potentially make more efficient solar cells or brighter LEDs. The role of light in semiconductor manufacturing may help explain many puzzling differences between processing methods as well as unlock the potential of materials that could not be used previously. Scarpulla and Alberi reported their findings in a paper titled “Suppression of Compensating Native Defect Formation During Semiconductor Processing Via Excess Carriers,” published June 16 in the journal, Scientific Reports. The research was funded by[...]

Recipient of Leadership Award and College Convocation Speaker

Recipient of Leadership Award and College Convocation Speaker

June 10th, 2016

Congratulations to Daniel Khoury for receiving the leadership award and speaking at the 2016 college convocation! Born and raised in Salt Lake City, Daniel Khoury has always been fascinated by how software and hardware interact. He knew computer engineering was the perfect fit to pursue his career because it would provide him with a firm foundation in both hardware and software development. Khoury embarked on his academic journey at the University of Utah in fall 2010 and graduated at the end of spring 2016 with both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in computer engineering. During his studies, he interned twice with Microsoft and was subsequently offered a full-time position in Washington starting this September as a software development engineer. One of the biggest lessons Khoury learned from his education at the U is that you always need to be ready to accept new[...]

U Robot Team Wins Award

U Robot Team Wins Award

May 23rd, 2016

The University of Utah’s mining robot team struck gold in them Martian hills, winning the Innovation Award as well as third place overall in the 2016 NASA Robotic Mining Competition in Cape Canaveral, Florida. It is only the second time the team has competed in the annual contest.The Utah Mining Robotic Mining Project — comprised of 14 members from the U’s departments of mechanical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, geology, mining engineering and computer engineering — competed May 18 to 20 with a robot that simulates scooping up Martian ice. In all, 45 schools from across the country were involved in the NASA event.“It’s amazing,” team member and mechanical engineering senior, Teresa Petty, said about taking third place and winning the Innovation Award. “It was like the experience of a lifetime. It’s incredible just to go to NASA and get feedback from NAS[...]

From the Navy to the U

From the Navy to the U

March 14th, 2016

Cory Boren is what is known in modern nomenclature as a “math wizard.” Serving for eight years as a sonar technician in the U.S. Navy and traveling around the world, from Norway to Panama to Bahrain, he used trigonometry and other complicated calculations to determine the speed and course of submarines and their contacts. While aboard Navy submarines, Boren made quick decisions about where his ship would go and how it would behave, which developed a deep sense of duty and personal responsibility for the safety and well-being of his crewmates. “I understood that every action I did, even though I didn’t think about it, directly affected and impacted other people’s lives as well,” he said. This conscientiousness stayed with Boren when he left the military three years ago to start his electrical engineering degree at the University of Utah. He helps other stude[...]

Flat, Ultrathin Camera Lens

Flat, Ultrathin Camera Lens

February 12th, 2016

Imagine digital cameras or smartphones without the bulky lenses or eyeglasses with lenses that are paper thin.Researchers have always thought that flat, ultrathin optical lenses for cameras or other devices were impossible because of the way all the colors of light must bend through them. Consequently, photographers have had to put up with more cumbersome and heavier curved lenses. But University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professor Rajesh Menon and his team have developed a new method of creating optics that are flat and thin yet can still perform the function of bending light to a single point, the basic step in producing an image.His findings were published Friday, Feb. 12, in a new paper, “Chromatic-Aberration-Corrected Diffractive Lenses for Ultra-Broadband Focusing,” in the current issue of Scientific Reports. The study was co-authored by University of Utah doctoral students Peng Wan[...]

Faculty Honored by Career Services

Faculty Honored by Career Services

February 10th, 2016

Five faculty members from the University of Utah’s College of Engineering are among 20 people campus-wide to be recognized by the university’s Career Services for its first annual Faculty Recognition Program.The award is given to faculty who contribute to students’ career development and exploration. Nominations were made by students, and winners were selected for their dedication to help students find resources, guide their career paths and realize their potential. Career Services received more than 120 nominations for the awards.Winners from the College of Engineering are:Tony Butterfield, assistant professor (lecturer) in chemical engineering.Ryan Bown, assistant professor (lecturer) in Entertainment Arts & Engineering.Joel Harley, assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering.Taylor Sparks, assistant professor in materials sciences and engineering.Ashley Spear, assistant professor in mechanical engineering.“With a campus of over 31,000 students, we recognize that our career coaching staff of 10 cannot possibly meet wi[...]

Engineering Club Rush

Engineering Club Rush

January 19th, 2016

Thanks to the biannual Engineering Club Rush event, engineering students can learn about the University of Utah chapter of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and realize it’s not just a niche engineering organization.The ANS chapter at the U welcomes all engineering students, and it’s at the club rush that the local organization can show off the benefits of joining.“Nuclear engineering is a small world,” said U chapter president Samantha Winkle. “So the more you can meet people in the industry the better off you are.”The newest Engineering Club Rush, which also is held in the fall, will be Thursday, Jan. 21, in the WEB Catmull Gallery from noon to 3 p.m. The event is open to all engineering students interested in joining a club, and food will be provided.More than 10 clubs will be represented at this year’s club rush, including the[...]

Arn Stolp Receives Professor Recognition Award

Arn Stolp Receives Professor Recognition Award

December 18th, 2015

Arn Stolp, associate instructor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah, was recently honored with a Professor Recognition Award from the Mortar Board Senior Honors Society and Order of Omega Greek Honors Society. The award was given in recognition for his excellence in teaching and his exceptional service as a professor. A banquet was held Dec. 1, and the award was presented by the nominating student, Jeppesen Feliciano. Mr. Stolp teaches the introductory power course as well as the ECE required course for non-majors. Mortar Board, Inc., was founded in 1918 as a national honor society that recognizes college seniors for their achievements in scholarship, leadership, and service; provides opportunities for continued leadership development; promotes service to colleges and universities; and encourages lifelong contributions to the global community. Nearly a quarter of a million members have[...]

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