From the Navy to the U

From the Navy to the U

March 14th, 2016

Cory Boren is what is known in modern nomenclature as a “math wizard.” Serving for eight years as a sonar technician in the U.S. Navy and traveling around the world, from Norway to Panama to Bahrain, he used trigonometry and other complicated calculations to determine the speed and course of submarines and their contacts. While aboard Navy submarines, Boren made quick decisions about where his ship would go and how it would behave, which developed a deep sense of duty and personal responsibility for the safety and well-being of his crewmates. “I understood that every action I did, even though I didn’t think about it, directly affected and impacted other people’s lives as well,” he said. This conscientiousness stayed with Boren when he left the military three years ago to start his electrical engineering degree at the University of Utah. He helps other stude[...]

Flat, Ultrathin Camera Lens

Flat, Ultrathin Camera Lens

February 12th, 2016

Imagine digital cameras or smartphones without the bulky lenses or eyeglasses with lenses that are paper thin.Researchers have always thought that flat, ultrathin optical lenses for cameras or other devices were impossible because of the way all the colors of light must bend through them. Consequently, photographers have had to put up with more cumbersome and heavier curved lenses. But University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professor Rajesh Menon and his team have developed a new method of creating optics that are flat and thin yet can still perform the function of bending light to a single point, the basic step in producing an image.His findings were published Friday, Feb. 12, in a new paper, “Chromatic-Aberration-Corrected Diffractive Lenses for Ultra-Broadband Focusing,” in the current issue of Scientific Reports. The study was co-authored by University of Utah doctoral students Peng Wan[...]

Faculty Honored by Career Services

Faculty Honored by Career Services

February 10th, 2016

Five faculty members from the University of Utah’s College of Engineering are among 20 people campus-wide to be recognized by the university’s Career Services for its first annual Faculty Recognition Program.The award is given to faculty who contribute to students’ career development and exploration. Nominations were made by students, and winners were selected for their dedication to help students find resources, guide their career paths and realize their potential. Career Services received more than 120 nominations for the awards.Winners from the College of Engineering are:Tony Butterfield, assistant professor (lecturer) in chemical engineering.Ryan Bown, assistant professor (lecturer) in Entertainment Arts & Engineering.Joel Harley, assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering.Taylor Sparks, assistant professor in materials sciences and engineering.Ashley Spear, assistant professor in mechanical engineering.“With a campus of over 31,000 students, we recognize that our career coaching staff of 10 cannot possibly meet wi[...]

Engineering Club Rush

Engineering Club Rush

January 19th, 2016

Thanks to the biannual Engineering Club Rush event, engineering students can learn about the University of Utah chapter of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and realize it’s not just a niche engineering organization.The ANS chapter at the U welcomes all engineering students, and it’s at the club rush that the local organization can show off the benefits of joining.“Nuclear engineering is a small world,” said U chapter president Samantha Winkle. “So the more you can meet people in the industry the better off you are.”The newest Engineering Club Rush, which also is held in the fall, will be Thursday, Jan. 21, in the WEB Catmull Gallery from noon to 3 p.m. The event is open to all engineering students interested in joining a club, and food will be provided.More than 10 clubs will be represented at this year’s club rush, including the[...]

Arn Stolp Receives Professor Recognition Award

Arn Stolp Receives Professor Recognition Award

December 18th, 2015

Arn Stolp, associate instructor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah, was recently honored with a Professor Recognition Award from the Mortar Board Senior Honors Society and Order of Omega Greek Honors Society. The award was given in recognition for his excellence in teaching and his exceptional service as a professor. A banquet was held Dec. 1, and the award was presented by the nominating student, Jeppesen Feliciano. Mr. Stolp teaches the introductory power course as well as the ECE required course for non-majors. Mortar Board, Inc., was founded in 1918 as a national honor society that recognizes college seniors for their achievements in scholarship, leadership, and service; provides opportunities for continued leadership development; promotes service to colleges and universities; and encourages lifelong contributions to the global community. Nearly a quarter of a million members have[...]

Dean Brown Receives Prestigious Honors

Dean Brown Receives Prestigious Honors

December 17th, 2015

Richard B. Brown, dean of the University of Utah’s College of Engineering, received two prestigious honors on the same day: He was elected to the National Academy of Inventors, and he was awarded the Governor’s Medal for Excellence in Science and Technology.Brown, the University’s 11th dean of the College of Engineering, was elected as a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, one of 168 named in 2015, bringing the total number of NAI Fellows to 582 from more than 190 universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutions. Past University of Utah fellows include President David W. Pershing, Electrical and Computer Engineering professor Cynthia M. Furse and Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering Stephen C. Jacobsen.Fellows who are elected are academic inventors “who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangibl[...]

Bright Idea for Lowlight Photography

Bright Idea for Lowlight Photography

October 29th, 2015

Anyone who’s taken a picture of birthday candles being blown out or a selfie during a romantic candlelit dinner knows how disappointing it is when the photo comes out dark and grainy.But University of Utah Electrical and Computer Engineering professor Rajesh Menon has developed a new camera color filter that lets in three times more light than conventional filters, resulting in much cleaner, more accurate pictures taken in lowlight. The new filter can be used for any kind of digital camera, but Menon is developing it specifically for smartphone cameras. Menon and doctoral student Peng Wang describe the invention today in the journal, Optica.“Overall, camera phones are very good, but they are not very good in lowlight,” says Menon. “If you go out on a hike in the evening and take a picture of the sky you will see that it’s ve[...]

Craig M. Jorgensen Student Lounge and Study Room

Craig M. Jorgensen Student Lounge and Study Room

October 14th, 2015

Thanks to the generous contribution of University of Utah engineering alumnus Brett Helm, electrical and computer engineering students will be able to study, collaborate or just hang out in a new meeting space on campus designed to build a sense of community. The Craig M. Jorgensen Student Lounge and Study Room is an 850-square-foot area with a main lounge and two study rooms that each include an 80-inch monitor for presentations. The area is located in Room 2255 on the second floor of the Merrill Engineering Building. It is one of two new areas on the engineering campus made possible by a $100,000 leadership gift provided by Helm. His donation also made possible the naming of the Randall Lunt Executive Board Room in the Meldrum Civil Engineering Building in addition to the Craig M. Jorgensen Student Lounge and Study Room. “You look at[...]

Engineers Team Up For Pediatric Asthma Database

Engineers Team Up For Pediatric Asthma Database

September 29th, 2015

Electrical and Computer Engineering Associate Professor Neal Patwari and School of Computing Assistant Professor Miriah Meyer are part of a multidisciplinary team at the University of Utah that is creating a database of information studying the effects of air quality on kids with asthma.For many doctors, figuring out what caused a kid’s asthma attack means opening up regional air quality databases and applying a lot of guesswork.While pollution from cars and other sources is known to trigger asthma in some children, there are a number of lesser-understood factors that also increase their risk – everything from viral infections to stress to playing soccer all day.A team of University of Utah researchers has received a $5.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering to develop an informatics platform that will make it possible to cr[...]

ECE Welcomes New Faculty

ECE Welcomes New Faculty

September 18th, 2015

The University of Utah’s Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering would like to welcome three new faculty members who will strengthen the reputation and breadth of knowledge of our growing faculty. Pierre-Emmanuel Gaillardon Gaillardon begins Jan. 1 as an assistant professor. Previously, he was research assistant at CEA-LETI, Grenoble, France, and a visiting research associate at Stanford University. Gaillardon is recipient of the C-Innov 2011 best thesis award and the Nanoarch 2012 best paper award. He also works for EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, as a research associate at the Laboratory of Integrated Systems (LSI). He holds an Electrical Engineer degree from CPE-Lyon, France, a master’s in electrical engineering from INSA Lyon, France, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from CEA-LETI, Grenoble, France, and the University of Lyon. Gaillardon is focused on the development of reconfigurable logic architectures and circuits exploiting emerging device[...]

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