Support for International Community

Support for International Community

January 31st, 2017

The University of Utah strongly supports the international members of our community and values their many contributions to this campus. The continued ability to attract and support outstanding students and the highest quality faculty and staff from around the world is critical to excellence in teaching, research, and community engagement. This past week, as most of you are well aware, President Trump signed an executive order that suspends entry into the United States for various categories of travelers. The current order affects immigrant and non-immigrant status holders from seven countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. On Friday, Jan. 27, in anticipation of the president signing the executive order, a message of support and resources was sent to all international scholars and students at the U. The Office of General Counsel also reached out to employees affected by the travel[...]

I Can See Clearly Now

I Can See Clearly Now

January 26th, 2017

The days of wearing bifocals or constantly swapping out reading glasses might soon come to an end. A team led by University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professor Carlos Mastrangelo and doctoral student Nazmul Hasan has created “smart glasses” with liquid-based lenses that can automatically adjust the focus on what a person is seeing, whether it is far away or close up. Research on the adaptive lenses was published this week in a special edition of the journal, Optics Express. The paper was co-authored by U electrical and computer engineering associate professor Hanseup Kim and graduate researcher Aishwaryadev Banerjee. “Most people who get reading glasses have to put them on and take them off all the time,” says Mastrangelo, who also is a professor for USTAR, the Utah Science Technology and Research economic development initiative. “You don’t have to do that anymore. Yo[...]

Cynthia Furse To Receive Governor’s Medal

Cynthia Furse To Receive Governor's Medal

January 9th, 2017

Cynthia Furse, associate vice president for research at the University of Utah and professor of electrical and computer engineering, will receive the 2016 Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology, continuing a long list of University of Utah College of Engineering faculty who have been given the honor.“I’m very humbled to receive this honor. I’ve loved engineering,” she said. “It’s been a tremendously rewarding career.”Furse is one of six who have been awarded a medal in the “Academic/Research” category this year and is the only faculty member in the U’s College of Engineering to be named. The recipients will be honored during an awards dinner Jan. 18.The awards, sponsored by the Governor’s Office for Economic Development and the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative, have been given to people and companies who have “provided distinguished service or made significant contributions to Utah’s advanced scientifi[...]

ECE Faculty at CES 2017

ECE Faculty at CES 2017

January 4th, 2017

University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professors Carlos Mastrangelo and Cynthia Furse as well as associate professor Hanseup Kim will be showing off new technologies at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. They are two of four teams from the U that will be displaying their products during the convention. The teams are profiled in the U's campus newsletter.Four innovative University of Utah technologies will be exhibited at Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2017, the world’s largest and best-known technology trade show. The event runs from Jan. 5-8 in Las Vegas. It marks the U’s third consecutive year at the event—and largest representation yet. CES, which attracted more than 177,000 visitors and 3,800 exhibitors from around the world last year, introduces next-generation innovations to the marketplace.“We look forward to our expanded involvement at CES 2017,” said Keith Marmer, executive[...]

High-Tech Hidden Messages From Everyday Products

High-Tech Hidden Messages From Everyday Products

January 3rd, 2017

Scientists at the University of Utah found that they could hide QR codes by using small rods printed with varying mixtures of silver and carbon and in varying lengths and orientations.(From Daniel Akst/The Wall Street Journal) Invisible ink has long been a staple of love, war and intrigue. In a new twist on the ancient concept of hidden writing, scientists have come up with a way to encode messages in innocuous-looking markings that can only be decoded with a specific type of electromagnetic radiation. And they managed it with cheap, off-the-shelf products available on the internet. Researchers at the University of Utah used a standard inkjet printer costing less than $60 and equipped it with specialty ink cartridges, also readily available, containing either carbon or silver. In printing, the inkjet device mixed the two as required by instructions from a computer, just[...]

Jorgensen to Receive Distinguished Alumni Award

Jorgensen to Receive Distinguished Alumni Award

December 21st, 2016

Not one but two alumni from the College of Engineering will receive the University of Utah’s annual Distinguished Alumni Award in 2017.School of Computing assistant professor Miriah Meyer and entrepreneur David Jorgensen will receive the awards during the university’s Founders Day in March.Meyer earned her doctorate in computer science from the U in 2008 and became a USTAR assistant professor in 2011. She also is a faculty member in the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute. Her research focuses on the design of visualization systems to help make sense of complex data. She will receive the Distinguished Young Alumni Award.David Jorgensen graduated with a degree in electrical engineering in 1961 and became a successful entrepreneur and investor. He became the chief executive officer of a high-tech market research firm and co-founded a company which provided replacement parts and supplies for copiers and[...]

Printing Hidden Images

Printing Hidden Images

December 8th, 2016

Researchers have developed a way to use commercial inkjet printers and readily available ink to print hidden images that are only visible when illuminated with appropriately polarized waves in the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The inexpensive method could be used as a type of invisible ink to hide information in otherwise normal-looking images, making it possible to distinguish between authentic and counterfeit items, for example.“We used silver and carbon ink to print an image consisting of small rods that are about a millimeter long and a couple of hundred microns wide,” said Ajay Nahata from the University of Utah, leader of the research team. “We found that changing the fraction of silver and carbon in each rod changes the conductivity in each rod just slightly, but visually, you can't see this modification. Passing terahertz radiation at the correct frequ[...]

Rebecca Novy Selected for Award

Rebecca Novy Selected for Award

November 30th, 2016

We are pleased to announce that ECE student Rebecca Novy has been selected to receive an award from the IEEE PES Scholarship Plus Initiative for the 2016/2017 academic year. Rebecca is an outstanding student interested in power and energy systems, and passionate about pursuing her career in the power industry. She is also vice-chair of the IEEE PES Student Chapter at the University of Utah’s ECE Department, helping other students to learn more about the power and energy systems. The award is very selective. Only 230 students across the USA, Canada and Puerto Rico receive the award. The award is given to undergraduate students in electrical engineering who have expressed interest in the power and energy field and who have maintained high GPAs. The $2,000 annual award is renewable for up to three years.[...]

Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Now You See It, Now You Don't

November 10th, 2016

From Harry Potter’s Cloak of Invisibility to the Romulan cloaking device that rendered their warship invisible in “Star Trek,” the magic of invisibility was only the product of science fiction writers and dreamers.But University of Utah electrical and computer engineering associate professor Rajesh Menon and his team have developed a cloaking device for microscopic photonic integrated devices — the building blocks of photonic computer chips that run on light instead of electrical current — in an effort to make future chips smaller, faster and consume much less power.Menon’s discovery was published online Wednesday in the latest edition of the science journal, Nature Communications. The paper was co-written by University of Utah doctoral student Bing Shen and Randy Polson, senior optical engineer in the U’s Utah Nanofab.The future of computers, data centers and mobile devices will involve photonic chips in which data is shutt[...]

A Complete Waste of Energy

A Complete Waste of Energy

October 27th, 2016

According to the National Resource Defense Council, Americans waste up to $19 billion annually in electricity costs due to “vampire appliances,” always-on digital devices in the home that suck power even when they are turned off.But University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professor Massood Tabib-Azar and his team of engineers have come up with a way to produce microscopic electronic switches for appliances and devices that can grow and dissolve wires inside the circuitry that instantly connect and disconnect electrical flow. With this technology, consumer products such as smartphones and computer laptops could run at least twice as long on a single battery charge, and newer all-digital appliances such as televisions and video game consoles could be much more power efficient.Tabib-Azar’s research was published in a new paper this week in the current issue of Solid State Electronics. The paper[...]

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